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Old 03-21-11, 04:14 PM   #1
Xringer
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Default DIY 230vac adjustable power limiter

This 230vac adjustable power limiter can be pre-set to turn off AC power
to a load and reset itself within a few hundred milliseconds.



The blue device on the left, is a non-contact current sensor.
It's set-point has been set to about 9.5 amps. (~2300 watts).

The dark blue box (lower right) contains a transistor switch that sends
5 VDC to the two SSR on each side of the (open) 10A breaker in the middle.
(The green LEDs on the SSRs indicate they are on).


If the load exceeds 2.3kw, the current sensor closes it's contacts.
This grounds out the base of the transistor, shutting it off.
That removes the +5v control signal from the SSRs, shutting them down.
(The SSRs turn off as the AC voltage crosses Zero volts).

~~~ The Sanyo hiccups!

Once the current stops, the current sensor shuts down.
(It gets it's power from the magnetic field of the 230vac line).
It's contacts become open. A cap on the base of the transistor
charges up and the transistor turns back on.
That turns on the SSRs and the Sanyo restarts within a few seconds.
(The SSRs turn ON as the AC voltage crosses Zero volts).

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Old 03-21-11, 04:23 PM   #2
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Default

Pretty slick little setup.

What happens when the Sanyo restarts?
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Old 03-21-11, 05:14 PM   #3
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Default Heat sinks is staying below 70F

The first test was done with High Power mode on.
Which is always good for a big ramp up in power use. Maybe around 2.6 to 3kw..
When it hit the set-point, it went quite for a second, started right back up,
but at normal power levels (460w).
Then started the stepping-up sequence again, heading for 3kw,
but never getting there. At 2.3kw, it hiccuped again.
After three hic-cycles, I took it out of HP mode.

Right now, we have a lot of snow and ice on the coil, so I'm waiting to see
if we get a defrost cycle. That would be a good test of the unit.

If it can get into defrost mode (where it normally uses 1400-1600 watts),
I'll be very interested in seeing what happens when the famous
After-Defrost-Surge* automatically kicks in.

If the auto-breaker's short drop-out can make the Sanyo restart and run
up to a more reasonable power level, I'll be happy.

If it can't save itself from repeating the defrost power surge after
the drop-out, then I'll change the time delay and made the delay a few seconds.
That will insure a normal power-up cycle without a crazy surge.


~~~
* After-Defrost-Surge note:
My theory is, that some Japanese management guy decided that Americans
are so impatient, they will want a big strong blast of heat, within seconds,
after the defrost cycle.. So, set motors for ludicrous speed!
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Old 03-22-11, 07:45 AM   #4
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It worked!! Read the latest news over at
http://ecorenovator.org/forum/geothe...html#post12588
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Old 04-01-11, 06:06 PM   #5
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Default Little blue box

In the lower right side of this picture, there is a little blue box..



It contains this little transistor circuit.



The AC current sensor closes it's contacts at ~9.5A and shorts out the voltage
from R2, that's been keeping Q1 turned on. Once Q1 turns off, the SSRs
also turn off, causing the Sanyo to Hiccup.

~~~

Last night and this morning, we had a little snow storm. (it's still snowing now)!
The wind was blowing the snow around, the temperature was 32F, the Dewpoint was 31F and the humidity was 99%..

Snow and ice was quickly covering up the Sanyo air intake.
This AM, we started watching the defrost cycles. Smooth as black ice!
This is the way my Sanyo was meant to work!
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Old 09-17-11, 11:23 PM   #6
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Default Hacking Sanyo outdoor units?



Looking at this diagram of the Sanyo Outdoor Unit, I can see how the
Power Relay (upper right) could be easily replaced with a 240vac SSR.

I would bring in 5VDC from outside to control the SSR, keeping the High
Pressure Switch(HPS) and OverLoad Relay (OLR) in series with the 5VDC.

It would not be difficult to add a current sensor(@9.5A) with
it's control circuit (see above) in series with the OLR & HPS contacts.
(The transistor would control the ground side of the 5v power source).

Thus eliminating the need for that messy looking relay rig inside the house..

During mild weather, the crankcase heater and other vampire loads could
be dropped off the grid, by using a spare X10 to control the indoor 5V power supply.

~~~

It just occurred to me, a second Sanyo Outdoor unit (@9.5A) could
possibly be connected to the same outdoor 230vac power disconnect box..
Assuming 20A breakers were installed in mains box.
Saving a few bucks for another permit..
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Old 10-03-11, 08:15 PM   #7
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Default Power control hack

Here's the before pic.


This is going to be the after Hack pic..
[IMG][/IMG]

Terminal Plate Connector (5) is the switched side of the 230 supply.
The SSR connects (5) to (1), which feeds the indoor unit and the main PCB ACIN1.
The Transistor block will be the same as used above.
The DC power supply puts out 12VDC with AC inputs from 100 to 240 50/60hz.
Current sensor will be pre-set to drop power at 9.5 Amps.. (~2.3 kW).

This might void the warranty, so I am considering installing it outside the unit. (As above).

One added benefit of using an SSR is no contact spark.
Safer if there's any Propane leaking in the area. (BBQ tank on the back deck).

Last edited by Xringer; 09-05-12 at 01:09 PM..
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Old 10-04-11, 05:52 PM   #8
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Default This looked much neater in the diagram!



Three Wires:
brown wire from the current sense loop goes to (1)
brown wire from the SSR goes to (5)
White wire with spade lug goes to the WHT wire (high pressure sw etc).

This will be installed on the repaired (non-warranty) unit tomorrow.
Hopefully, those Ebay parts will do the job..

The Transistor box is from a recycled garage door Open wireless sensor.
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Old 10-05-11, 08:32 PM   #9
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Default Auto-breaker installed

It looked so neat before the hack.. (The compressor compartment is under this plate)


Afterwards, it has a kind of Hacked look..

No wires were cut and only one hole was drilled to bolt down the SSR.
So, if anything fails, the old relay can be reinstalled in about 5 minutes.

The current sensor is set for 10.0 amps and seems to be working perfectly.
The system (indoor & outdoor units) should never draw more than 2.4 kW.
Once the sensor trips, the indoor unit will reset and start where it left off,
before the power outage.
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Old 10-30-11, 09:28 AM   #10
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Default

I am gratified that I found your post. It prompted me to join this forum. I am considering the use of SSRs to add more control to my enphase micro inverters. The original thread is on the wind-sun forum under the heading: 10.78kW Enphase system and XW6048 (ForumVB/showthread.php?t=12041)

Thank you for making your information available. I plan to use it!!

Rex

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