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Old 08-22-16, 07:10 AM   #11
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You two have different types of condenser heat exchangers. The OP has a low density, flat hx that uses natural convective forces to release heat. These condensers are hard to improve upon.

Ecomodded has a high density, "pipe sandwich" exchanger in his fridge. These use forced air (via a small, quiet fan) to move the heat away. This is the type of unit I use to make really efficient space heaters or dehumidifiers out of. I also use the condensing unit assemblies as refrigerant reclaimers and vacuum pumps. The lineset that runs to the evaporator in the box is long and flexible enough to run out a window or through a small hole, and conveniently comes with its own fan as well. Not as efficient as the low density types, but easier to hack.

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Old 08-22-16, 08:47 AM   #12
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If you realy want a low consumption of electricity, do as I did: I converted a freezer to a refrigerator. Only by installing another thermostat.
The freezer has much more insulation than a regular refrigerator. On all sides that is, not just at the back or close to the compressor.
Now the yearly electricity consumption of this 250 liter "refrigerator" is about 50 kWh..
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Old 08-23-16, 12:15 AM   #13
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Yeah, but that wouldn't be approved by wife, and I also need freezer that's freezing (for leftovers, or meat, frozen pizza...) :-)
Also, I've read there are some problems with condensation inside converted freezer, aren't there?
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Old 08-23-16, 02:24 AM   #14
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You're right. Condensation is an issue.
But since the freezer was a type with drawers and the evaporator consists of different plates (one above each drawer) and the evaporating cooling fluid enters in the highest plate, most condensation takes place in the top. So just above the top drawer.
We regulary empty the water from top drawer. And when this is done on a regular basis, not much condensation takes place on the lower evaporator plates.
We use the top drawer for bottles only. And it's not a problem if they get a little wet.
I have plans, to connect a hose to the top drawer and bring it to the outside, so that condensation water will be removed.
But as with so many plans, they take time of which I have not so much available...
Maybe in the future......
By the way, we also have a auto-defrost freezer, where the condensation was originally led to the top of the compressor (to be evaporated again, but than outside of the freezer).
I changed it a little so that the water is collected in a bottle and we use it for an ironing station nowadays.
We don't need to buy demineralised water anymore....
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Old 08-23-16, 02:40 AM   #15
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oh, so it's not a chest freezer convert, now I get it. I didn't see any of regular cabinet freezers converted.

Yeah, I have the same drain - from refrigerator to container on top of compressor. (But we don't iron - ever, so I couldn't use the water)
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Old 08-23-16, 07:34 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimiQ View Post
oh, so it's not a chest freezer convert, now I get it. I didn't see any of regular cabinet freezers converted.

You might be interested in looking at this:

AC_Hacker's Hasty Freezer Conversion Reduces Energy Use By 61%

Best,

-AC_Hacker
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Old 08-26-16, 08:41 AM   #17
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There's a populated island near my area called Lasqueti island that is without conventional electricity. Everyone uses Sun or Wind and Water as a micro power plant.


And everyone uses a converted chest freezer as a fridge as the doors position and the increased insulation factor work together.
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Old 10-06-16, 01:35 AM   #18
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So final numbers are 197kWh per 365 days, or around 540Wh/d. A bit higher than I expected, but still very nice.
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Old 10-06-16, 09:42 AM   #19
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Not bad at all. That is still roughly half or less than a normal fridge. I'm pretty sure I'm at 1.1 to 1.3 kwh per day.
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Old 10-08-16, 02:47 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimiQ View Post
So will anyone else try this? I'd like to know if my results are repeatable
I did more or less the same (foiled insulation between the back wall of the fridge and the hx coils, all the way down to insulate from the compressor's heat), and additionally moved the coils farther away (by 2-4cm), improving ventilation. This was 5 years ago and still going strong, the only issue I once had was condensation between the fridge wall and the insulation.

Quote:
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The majority of the savings will be saved from the insulation on the bottom of the fridge , it gets way to warm down there to not be insulated. A design flaw really.
One of the downsides of the bottom-freezer design - the temperature difference between the compressor and freezer is greater than if the freezer was at the top.

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