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Old 02-09-16, 09:30 PM   #1
pletby
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Default Foil Faced EPS Basement Window Insulation

Hey Gang! I decided to insulate my basement windows as they really were a glaring point of heat loss. I had at first wanted to use bubble wrap, but decided since I didn't have any on hand to go ahead with a different route. We don't really use the basement during the day anyway, so the light won't be missed. The basement is unfinished except for a rec room installed in the 60's or 70's. It's all wood paneled with a tile floor.

The windows are old aluminum single panes doubled up. I could feel the draft falling down from them in a little cold snap we're having. 3 of the 4 have heat shrink plastic installed and I can tell it's helping a bit as they have not frosted as much as the one that's not sealed up.



This is the before shot of a window with the heat shrink film on it. Still cold window frame. These frosted up at -30C or 22 below.



This is after I carefully cut the panel to size and caulked around it with silicone. I noticed an immediate difference.



Here's the Rec Room Window. Also a big difference. We do hang out in this room for a little while each day so comfort factor will go up.

They are very shiny with the insulation installed! I'll re hang the curtains in front of them and it won't be as noticeable.

I may do this in an upstairs closet, as it's a closet! What the heck does it need a window for anyway? Looks. From the front street it looks nice. I'll have to figure out what to put between the insulation and the window so it'll still look nice. Then maybe our clothes won't be so cold to put on.


Last edited by pletby; 02-11-16 at 03:23 PM.. Reason: Better pictures
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Old 02-10-16, 03:08 AM   #2
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pletby View Post
Hey Gang! I decided to insulate my basement windows as they really were a glaring point of heat loss. I had at first wanted to use bubble wrap, but decided since I didn't have any on hand to go ahead with a different route. We don't really use the basement during the day anyway, so the light won't be missed. The basement is unfinished except for a rec room installed in the 60's or 70's. It's all wood paneled with a tile floor.

The windows are old aluminum single panes doubled up. I could feel the draft falling down from them in a little cold snap we're having. 3 of the 4 have heat shrink plastic installed and I can tell it's helping a bit as they have not frosted as much as the one that's not sealed up.



Here's the unsealed window. It's open on one side for my solar heater penetrations. This one really needs help. Note the frost. It's -20C outside or 4 below. I'm leaving this window for last as it's going to be tricky. This forum doesn't like a portrait shot apparently, it's turned sideways!



This is the laundry window. I carefully cut the panel to size and caulked around it with silicone. It's easily cut with a sharp knife in the spring. I noticed an immediate difference.



Here's the Rec Room Window. Also a big difference. We do hang out in this room for a little while each day so comfort factor will go up.

They are very shiny with the insulation installed! I'll re hang the curtains in front of them and it won't be as noticeable.

I may do this in an upstairs closet, as it's a closet! What the heck does it need a window for anyway? Looks. From the front street it looks nice. I'll have to figure out what to put between the insulation and the window so it'll still look nice. Then maybe our clothes won't be so cold to put on.
Stick a miniblind in that bogus window. Make it so you can see through the blind with the louver angle, it helps stop convection currents. Paint the outside of your insulation panel to taste with something high-temp, as it can get pretty hot in the cavity on a sunny day. As long as you leave it alone, the miniblind will last 30 years and look good doing it.
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Old 02-11-16, 03:11 PM   #3
pletby
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Default Part 2

Ok, I've been at this a few days now (maybe 4 hours total) and have wrapped up the basement windows. The window with the solar panel duct penetrations was the most difficult but with measure twice cut once mindset I did pretty well. I needed to shave 1/8" off of the top and one side of a duct. Second try fit perfect.

This window by far had the worst cold air infiltration.



Before. Note frost buildup to the left of the ducts along window edge below centre.



After second test fit. Silicone is next. I needed to extend a cut to the left of the ducts to get enough 'give' to get over the ducts. I will cover this with aluminum tape.



Detail around ducts.

I will do a leak test in a few hours when there's a good skin on the silicone and see if there's any cracks I missed.

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