EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Renovations & New Construction
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-26-13, 08:04 AM   #1
Exalta-STA
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Philippines
Posts: 107
Thanks: 12
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default Ceiling Repair

I have an extra room downstairs that I would like to turn into something inhabitable. Unfortunately it is always damp there and now some parts of the gypsum ceiling fell.









It seems that I need to seal or waterproof those drain lines...those pipes are the sewer and sink/drain lines of the restroom on the second floor.

can i coat/wrap those pipes in concrete?or sealant?

then i plan on installing a polycarbonate ceiling that can resist moisture better than gypsum..but on top of it, I'll install Styrofoam to act as an additional waterproofing barrier and sound insulation so the occupant of this room would not hear the toilet flushing/sink water flowing..

Exalta-STA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-13, 09:04 AM   #2
AC_Hacker
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
AC_Hacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,002
Thanks: 303
Thanked 712 Times in 532 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Exalta-STA View Post
Unfortunately it is always damp there and now some parts of the gypsum ceiling fell...
You now have a liability...

In my opinion, none of the solutions you have suggested would make your basement suitable for human habitation.

The level of moisture that would make sheet rock disintegrate is so high that your basement room will quickly become a mold garden for anything organic that you put in it. From your photos, I can see mold growing on the paper that covers the gypsum ceiling. The mold spores can certainly do permanent damage to the respiratory system of anyone who occupies that space.

It might be possible to build a completely non-organic air-proof and water-proof envelope for that space and also run a dehumidifier and ventilator and run a HEPA air filter all the time.


On the other hand, you could turn your liability into an asset...

You could grow delicious mushrooms to sell to local restaurants.

Best,

-AC
__________________
I'm not an HVAC technician. In fact, I'm barely even a hacker...
AC_Hacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-13, 03:13 PM   #3
ecomodded
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Vancouver Island,Canada.
Posts: 1,036
Thanks: 116
Thanked 100 Times in 87 Posts
Default

My advice for you

Find the source of the drips and repair , most likely its leaking from a separated joint from a drain but it could be a steady drip from a water pipe..
Remove all of the remaining 4x8 drywall sheets from the damaged area as more than likely they will be damaged / moldy.

After the pipes are repaired you can insulate them with a flexible wrap. put a vapor barrier over the floor joists then re-drywall.
ecomodded is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-13, 04:10 PM   #4
AC_Hacker
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
AC_Hacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,002
Thanks: 303
Thanked 712 Times in 532 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecomodded View Post
...Find the source of the drips...then re-drywall.
ecomodded,

I think your advice is quite correct, for Canada... but this guy lives in the Philippines, in the hot, humid tropical zone.

He has posted before, with photos of a door of his house that was on the main floor... a 'manufactured door' that was intended for temperate climates, but in his climate/humidity, it de-laminated and the glue & wood particle composite turned to mush.

He has an extreme situation.

-AC
__________________
I'm not an HVAC technician. In fact, I'm barely even a hacker...
AC_Hacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-13, 05:01 PM   #5
jeff5may
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: elizabethtown, ky, USA
Posts: 2,394
Thanks: 410
Thanked 604 Times in 506 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to jeff5may
Default

Yep, you've got a decent mystery to solve here, sir. This is not one of those situations where you can throw on a quick patch or band-aid and cover the affected area and simply let it heal on its own. If not done perfectly this problem will come back to haunt you with regularity and increasing expense.

Since the area is under a bathroom, I would rip out all the drywall directly below any bathroom fixtures (sinks, tubs, showers, toilets,etc) and inspect the top sides of the removed sheets for moisture or staining from moisture. Just because your panels rotted apart at the seam doesn't mean that's where the water came from. Drywall is relatively inexpensive as far as building materials go, so don't be afraid of taking too much out.

Once you have removed the wet drywall and identified and repaired the source of the moisture, make sure the enclosed cavities in between floors has had ample time to dry completely and that there is no mold anywhere in there. If there is still evidence of mold growth, those areas should be treated to remove any possibility of regrowth. It only takes a few spores to repopulate the entire area, so be thorough in your eradication.

If you get in there and can't find any obvious leaks, you may have an infiltration or migration problem. Water can follow piping for a very long distance if the pipes have much slope in them. However, it always leaves a trail, so finding the source is not super difficult. OTOH, the actual repair may be incredibly difficult and frustrating for a novice to perform correctly. Don't be ashamed to call in a pro if the repair looks daunting.

Last edited by jeff5may; 12-26-13 at 05:04 PM.. Reason: words
jeff5may is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-13, 11:57 PM   #6
Exalta-STA
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Philippines
Posts: 107
Thanks: 12
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Thanks for the replies looks like I really have to take out those boards. I used a mirror to see what's on the other side and saw that if even they look okay from down below, it looks like a jungle topside.

Once those boards are down, it'll be easier to access and observe those pipes...will have to lock down the upper restroom to avoid any additional moisture from seeping in while this area is being dried/repaired.

Just noticed that it is just some 2x2 wood beams holding those boards in place. What other material can I use aside from those? I'm afraid those things have been contaminated by rot/spores already and might give way soon also.

would encasing those pipes in concrete or polyurethane after thoroughly sealing them be a good idea?
Exalta-STA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-14, 11:23 PM   #7
torycooper
Lurking Renovator
 
torycooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Bethesda, MD, US
Posts: 6
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

The moisture level is very high, it would disintegrate everything that come in its path. It would be better to call some contractor as soon as possible.
torycooper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-14, 07:49 AM   #8
stevehull
Steve Hull
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: hilly, tree covered Arcadia, OK USA
Posts: 829
Thanks: 241
Thanked 165 Times in 123 Posts
Default

Looks like the drainage pipes are made of PVC plastic - am I correct? If so, this brings a different perspective.

I am leaning hard to a slow leak. Condensation on plastic is unusual - even in hot humid areas.

Are there water supply lines up in there? If so, what material are they made of?

Lastly, I suspect you have a high ground water temp - about 70 F (20C)?

Steve
__________________
consulting on geothermal heating/cooling & rational energy use since 1990
stevehull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-14, 09:10 AM   #9
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,482
Thanks: 1,117
Thanked 370 Times in 301 Posts
Default

How did you fix this issue? Is it working?
__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-14, 11:58 AM   #10
Exalta-STA
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Philippines
Posts: 107
Thanks: 12
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Hi there, sorry for not updating. I had a contractor take a look-see and they sealed the pipes, dried whatever moisture was left with heat guns. vented the room and repainted the walls with elastomeric paint.




Exalta-STA is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Exalta-STA For This Useful Post:
ecomodded (07-05-14)
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design