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Old 11-30-10, 11:44 AM   #1
AC_Hacker
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Default Home Heat Loss Calculator = Energy Simulation Tool

("Energy Simulation Tools" should probably be a Sub-Forum. I have compiled a pretty big list of other tools that Ecorenovators might want to try.)

I have located another Energy Simulation Tool, this one on the Build It Solar website. This tool has a very straight-forward interface. You'll need to enable JavaScript in order to use it. IMHO, it would be more useful if it were in Excel or equivalent form, so that heat-loads could be established, while off-line.


This tool is called Home Heat Loss Calculator, check it out...

Regards,

AC_Hacker

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MN Renovator (11-30-10)
Old 11-30-10, 04:44 PM   #2
RobertSmalls
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With Javascript, the complete script is embedded in the .html file, and the code is executed by your local machine. So right click your link, save as, et voila! It's usable even after you close your dial-up connection.
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Old 11-30-10, 07:20 PM   #3
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Thanks for this.

I calculated as 26746 for everything above grade. Based on the heat output of my furnace and last years therms calculated into CCF using the value of heat from the gas and then calculating run time of the furnace. I'm sitting at 6.55 calculated hours of run time as a daily average for January with an 75000 btu input, 57000 btu output furnace. Either a modular furnace 45000 btu high and 30000 btu low or just a 35000 btu furnace would probably do the trick. I think 35000 btu is about as small as you can buy them.

I figure this tool is probably pretty close to matching my guess of somewhere between 30000-45000 btu from a 95+ efficiency furnace even though I have no clue what insulation is between the walls and the outside.
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Old 11-30-10, 09:06 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertSmalls View Post
With Javascript, the complete script is embedded in the .html file, and the code is executed by your local machine.
I used to teach JavaScript, and it's not always so easy to grab it, but in this case, you are quite right.

I got my local copy running.

I even trimmed out some of the google-bits that made be a little nervous.

Thanks for the tip.

-AC_Hacker
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Old 11-30-10, 09:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN Renovator View Post
Thanks for this.

I calculated as 26746 for everything above grade. Based on the heat output of my furnace and last years therms calculated into CCF using the value of heat from the gas and then calculating run time of the furnace. I'm sitting at 6.55 calculated hours of run time as a daily average for January with an 75000 btu input, 57000 btu output furnace. Either a modular furnace 45000 btu high and 30000 btu low or just a 35000 btu furnace would probably do the trick. I think 35000 btu is about as small as you can buy them.

I figure this tool is probably pretty close to matching my guess of somewhere between 30000-45000 btu from a 95+ efficiency furnace even though I have no clue what insulation is between the walls and the outside.
Sizing a furnace for fossil fuels usually consists of doing a heating load calc like you did, and increase that by 50%, sometimes by 100% to arrive at furnace output.

Sizing a Heat Pump consists of doing a heating load calc like you did, and choosing a heat pump with a heating capacity that is slightly smaller than what is indicated. Then a back-up provision is designed in to cover the heating needs during exceptional conditions. Some of the heat pumps have built-in electrical resistance heating, some have built-in gas, natural gas or propane.

It sounds like you're really doing it right, by using a computer program and checking your results against your heating bill.

Since you have this information right at your fingertips, it would be a dandy idea to detail your work with images and all, as an example for others who may be thinking along similar lines.

Best Regards,

-AC_Hacker

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