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Old 04-01-09, 06:49 PM   #11
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So based on what you can see from the pictures, how would you guys and gals modify this fridge ?

Also, what type of insulation can I place around the fridge that is not a fire hazard ( yet eco-friendly of course )

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Old 04-02-09, 12:42 AM   #12
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You don't want to insulate over the condenser. If the sides feel warm after the compresser has ran for a while, that's where the condenser is. My mini-fridge is constructed this way and it looks like yours is too.

Nothing on a fridge should be hot enough be a fire hazard. Unless you insulate over the condenser, but the compressor should shut down or be destroyed before this happens.
What about insulating inside the fridge?

Maybe expanded polystyrene would be a good choice?
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I'm not convinced whether laying down a fridge really helps because I haven't seen any test results. Obviously if you open the door a lot it will make a difference.
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Old 04-02-09, 07:42 AM   #13
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Insulate the insides except where the evaporator is.
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Old 04-02-09, 09:11 AM   #14
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It might be easier to sell the fridge and buy a small deep freeze instead. It would be really simple to modify the power cord with a line voltage thermostat (something designed for a small walk-in cooler).
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Old 04-02-09, 03:34 PM   #15
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there are some really cheap chest freezers out there and some thermostats for fermenting beer in your fridge that give you more control, you stick the probe in the fridge and plug the cord in to the device.

It's to hard to tell from the photos exactly how things are arranged, I think you will need to simply read some books on fridge repair to get a better understanding of how they work.
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Old 04-04-09, 10:07 AM   #16
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I'm confused ; A couple of you folks are asking me to insulate the INSIDE of the fridge.
Can you be more specific ? Are you talking about the inside walls of the fridge, or the actuall inside where the food is ?
This thing is crammed with food as it is already.
If you mean insulate the inside, that brings up a question : Which is more efficient, a fridge that is packed with food, or one that is half empty ?
I would think the one packed with more food,since the cold food would actually keep the food around itself cool as well. ( But I'm guessing )
Also, what about when the freezer has ice buildup on its sides ? Is this more efficient ( for the same reason as described above ), or does it actually make the fridge work harder ? I'm guessing not, since that's probably why they have " frost free " frdiges.
And ... yes, I have no idea what I am talking about.
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Old 04-08-09, 10:44 AM   #17
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Yes, a full fridge is more efficient. There's more thermal inertia.

I'm not sure about the ice affecting efficiency. I think the 'frost-free' technology is to keep the freezer from becoming completely ice-jammed (I've seen it happen) and ruining food.
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Old 04-09-09, 07:25 PM   #18
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Well, I took all of the food out of the mini-frige and started using the full size one.
The very first thing that I noticed was how LOUD that the full size one was.
Also, the heat coming from the thing is really noticeable. The kitchen feels like I am using an oven now. ( Supposedly, the fridge is newermodel - a 2007 Kenmore. 14.8 Cubic foot and burns 355 kWh per year - compared to the mini-frig which uses 337 kWh ! )
Power consumption on the mini-frige was 101-102 watts while the full size starts at 184 watts and dips down to 156 watts at the end of its 15 minute run cycle.
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Old 04-09-09, 07:44 PM   #19
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I tried to see if I could move the compressor today, and I managed to get it to move around just like the instructable. I had thought that the copper lines were too short, but I have plenty of play to work with.
I plan to try and convert this thing to a chest fridge, but I am going to do it in such a way that it is reversible.
Along the way, I will take some readings and post them for a sort of A-B-A-B test.
I predict that the only change might be that I lose my freezer, and just end up with a really awkward fridge.

If that happens, I'll just bend the thing back into shape and use it as is.

Now - about that insulation .... any advice ? I'd like to use something that is eco-friendly. We sell isulation at work made from recycled paper. I'm just worried about its flammability. I'm still confused whether or not to insulate the sides of the fridge or not.
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Old 04-09-09, 07:51 PM   #20
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If I understand you fellas correctly, what makes this fridge inefficient is the lack of insullation, not something like a poor quality compressor. Right ?
I would convert a chest freezer to a chest fridge, but I want a freezer within the same unit.

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'frig, 3.1 cu ft. 'frig, freezer modification

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