EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Biofuels
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-10-12, 03:22 PM   #41
abafred
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 7
Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo NR Gee View Post
Well, my secondary burn modification to my wood stove is a success. After the fire was started and burning for about 10 minutes, there is a lack of smoke coming out the chimney. Its just amazing.

In the firebox I can see the flames are now a dark red mostly and dancing. The additional openings for the secondary burn air did not effect the closing of the factory damper and in fact you can really see how much better the fire burns at the top of the stove when it is dampered.

In all it took about 4 hours to fabricate it from start to finish. The cost was.....nothing really but some electricity and some welding supplies which were minimal.
Good info - thanks. I'm a newbie here so please excuse my ignorance. I've read this thread 3x and may still be missing it - is your secondary air forced in or what? Thank you.

abafred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-12, 03:56 PM   #42
nexsuperne
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: 30 miles east of London, UK
Posts: 88
Thanks: 12
Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts
Default

The secondary intake doesn't need to be forced. The secondary air on my burner comes in to the bottom of the burner, runs up the inside wall of the firebox (collecting heat from the fire) and then puts this super heated fresh air into the top of the firebox. This makes for a cleaner, hotter burn.
nexsuperne is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to nexsuperne For This Useful Post:
abafred (12-11-12)
Old 12-11-12, 01:30 PM   #43
chadb
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Mt. Orab, OH
Posts: 18
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

+1 on flue damper, fire bricks, and flue thermometer.

Flue temperature is very important. Too low = creosote buildup, too high = damage/fire (all that creosote buildup can ignite). I believe my thermometer has 150F - 400F marked as "Burn Zone".

If you have smoke coming out the chimney you aren't burning all the gases and you're getting creosote. If anything glows, or you hear a noise like a train and flames shoot out of your chimney, you're burning too hot. The thermometers are fairly cheap.

I agree with comments about most houses being drafty enough to bring in fresh air. Also the stove is not going to pull in your warm air. The hot air is rising up to your ceiling. The stove will pull in cold air from the floor.

Just my two cents. Wood is all I heat with, other than a baseboard heater in my bathroom and my one in my son's room to keep him comfortable.
chadb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-12, 01:51 PM   #44
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,363
Thanks: 1,008
Thanked 350 Times in 285 Posts
Default

Well, if you're going to modify a stove for efficiency you might as well put a dedicated intake on it. That eliminates pulling air from the warm house.
__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-12, 05:26 PM   #45
abafred
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 7
Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daox View Post
Well, if you're going to modify a stove for efficiency you might as well put a dedicated intake on it. That eliminates pulling air from the warm house.
Makes sense but let me clarify that this is being used in a shop not a house if that matters. Question: If the house/shop/structure is not air tight, wouldn't heating efficiency be increased by bringing in cooler air from inside? or - will efficiency actually be increased because outside air will be even colder?
abafred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-13, 08:40 AM   #46
Kip
Cajun Innovater
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Central Louisiana
Posts: 12
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Talking Wood Heater

Morning guys,
My first post, love the site!

This thread is great. I am searching for info on how to heat my new shop and boy there sure is more here than meets the eye! I was just going to shove a chunk of wood in a drum and set it on fire but it seems its not that simple!

I hope no one minds me posting on this thread, but like I said. I'm looking for info here on heating my shop.

So, if there are no objections, I will begin my questioning.

I have a new 30x30 metal building and I need it heated. The building is made of commercial materials just like all the others, nothing special. I was thinking of getting the double barrel wood heater kit like you see on sites like Northern, but now, after reading all this stuff. I'm not sure if I should go this rout. Here in Louisiana, the winters are not as bad as some other places way up north like Shreveport. But, we have very wet winters. Wet and temps hover just above freezing makes for a cold day for a boy like me.

Should I go with a barrel system, or should I go with something else?
So barrels have removable lids, some don't. Some have had unhealthy products in them, so I was wondering about that also. Basically, I don't know where to start.

So if any of you wouldn't mind giving me a spoon full of the infinite wisdom of wood heaters, I would be much obliged.

EDIT: Happy New Year Everyone!

Thanks,
Kip
Kip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-13, 10:12 AM   #47
Xringer
Lex Parsimoniae
 
Xringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Woburn, MA
Posts: 4,836
Thanks: 105
Thanked 241 Times in 222 Posts
Default

Hello Kip and welcome
I'm no expert on wood stoves, but I know everyone is going to want more details about your building.

#1, How good is the insulation?
#2, Is 30x30x 18' high ceilings?
#3, How many sq ft of windows?
#4, What type of windows?
#5, Are the doors insulated? (Any garage doors?)
#6, Will the area require heat every day? (for how many hours?).
#7, Do you have a good source of wood (or other solid fuel)?
#8, Is the roof suitable for solar collectors? (Sun exposure good?)

That's all I can think of right now..


IIRC, a typical generic 30x30 living space would need approximately 18,000 BTUh for cooling or heating..
Depending on external factors.. Like 1 to 5 above..

The Average climate in Jackson, Louisiana (in pics)
seems like a nice place to live.. If you don't mind the dampness..
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	lhaq10158.png
Views:	288
Size:	15.5 KB
ID:	2802   Click image for larger version

Name:	humq10158.png
Views:	301
Size:	13.7 KB
ID:	2803  
__________________
My hobby is installing & trying to repair mini-splits
EPA 608 Type 1 Technician Certification ~ 5 lbs or less..
Xringer is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Xringer For This Useful Post:
Kip (01-01-13)
Old 01-01-13, 10:54 AM   #48
Geo NR Gee
Journeyman EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 325
Thanks: 109
Thanked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Default

Kip, how tall are your ceilings? My shop peaks out at about 20 feet. I installed the heat pump return air intake at that peak and have been able to pull the hot air and recirculate it across the ground level.

I can put in a total of two 5 gallon containers worth of wood (throughout the day) for about 12 hours of burn time in the stove and the shop is kept at 65 degrees all day. Any warmer than that, then it seems too hot.

When I arrive in the morning, its dropped to 59 degrees where the heat pump is set at. Within 30 minutes or less after throwing a few logs in the stove, its back to 65.

So far this winter, the electricity bills have been from $20 to $26 per month. That includes using the lights, welder, compressor, tools, and heat pump.

Last winter, it was $140 and up per month (heat pump only) and the winter before was $250 and up (oil furnace).

We just got the approval to install more insulation on one wall and put in a fresh air intake for the wood stove. Yesterday, I walked around and could feel the cold air being pulled in from around the doors and the uninsulated and unsealed windows. So installing insulation and sealing up the cracks and leaks will help even more in lowering heating and cooling expenses.

I do have one important suggestion. Season the wood before you burn it. That alone has helped me to get a really clean and long lasting burn. Plus the wood is not so heavy when carrying a load to the stove!
Geo NR Gee is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Geo NR Gee For This Useful Post:
Kip (01-01-13)
Old 01-01-13, 08:24 PM   #49
SimpleManLance
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South-East MI
Posts: 58
Thanks: 1
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chadb View Post
+1 on flue damper, fire bricks, and flue thermometer.

Flue temperature is very important. Too low = creosote buildup, too high = damage/fire (all that creosote buildup can ignite). I believe my thermometer has 150F - 400F marked as "Burn Zone".

If you have smoke coming out the chimney you aren't burning all the gases and you're getting creosote. If anything glows, or you hear a noise like a train and flames shoot out of your chimney, you're burning too hot. The thermometers are fairly cheap.

I agree with comments about most houses being drafty enough to bring in fresh air. Also the stove is not going to pull in your warm air. The hot air is rising up to your ceiling. The stove will pull in cold air from the floor.

Just my two cents. Wood is all I heat with, other than a baseboard heater in my bathroom and my one in my son's room to keep him comfortable.
I also heat with wood 99% of the time. As long as its above 45* I'm burning wood in our wood furnace. here is the gauge i use. I try to keep it in the orange, its about 18" off the back of the stove.

I would recommend a out side air intake. If the wood burner is sucking in cold air from the floor it still has to replace that air with outside cold air.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG1271.jpg
Views:	330
Size:	515.6 KB
ID:	2804  
__________________
Jack of all trades, master of none.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
SimpleManLance is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to SimpleManLance For This Useful Post:
Daox (01-02-13), Kip (01-01-13)
Old 01-01-13, 08:39 PM   #50
Kip
Cajun Innovater
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Central Louisiana
Posts: 12
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Guys,
Thanks for the response.
Geo NR Gee - I see you are in Seattle. Small world, my sister lives in Kent, and will be here this weekend. Meanwhile, back on the ranch......

To answer a few questions.
The building is 30x30x18 (Will try to post a pic)

It is only a workshop, I have not completed the inside yet, a few more circuit to run, then the insulation and T1-11 to cover it up. I don't want this to end up costing me much more that 500 or so. My electric bill for the shop is only about 30 bucks a month, and that is with the air compressor, welder, and all that stuff that goes in a shop.

I would like to keep the electric bill as low as I can. I wanted to go with a wood burning heater as I have 100 acres will all the wood I can handle....

There is insulation in the building R-19 in the walls 8 inch I think, and the ceiling has a thermal layer of insulation about an inch thick. I fight with the heat here more than I fight with the cold. But the builder suggested the thermal layer instead of other type of insulation.

#1, How good is the insulation? Not sure what you mean, I think your asking the "R" value. The walls are R-19 and the ceiling I really couldn't say. Insulation is new.

#2, Is 30x30x 18' high ceilings? Yes, 18'

#3, How many sq ft of windows? There are 3 windows, 2 in the front, and 1 in the back. 3' square maybe (each).

#4, What type of windows? Single pane, non insulated

#5, Are the doors insulated? (Any garage doors?) No, I have 2 roll up doors, 1 4'x10' door, and the other is 18'x10' 1 personnel door, metal.

#6, Will the area require heat every day? (for how many hours?). No, I will only heat while I am working or fooling around in the shop. I am away for 2 weeks a month, I work offshore on a 14/14 rotation.

#7, Do you have a good source of wood (or other solid fuel)? Yes, too much wood if you ask me....(or too much work)

#8, Is the roof suitable for solar collectors? (Sun exposure good?) I would think so, but not the rout I wanted to take, solar power just isn't for me.

Anyway, Here a re a few pics that I hope will shed some light on the subject.

I couldn't upload them to the site, something about a security token, but I put them on my SkyDrive. Here is the link. http://sdrv.ms/U6WQdR

Kip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
furnace, modify, stove, wood

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design