EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Renovations & New Construction
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-02-13, 06:33 AM   #1
stevehull
Steve Hull
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: hilly, tree covered Arcadia, OK USA
Posts: 829
Thanks: 241
Thanked 165 Times in 123 Posts
Default metal roof?

Been away from the site for a bit as we have recently had a LOT of storm damage here in Oklahoma. Not directly hit, but softball sized hail (destroyed roofs), wind (falling trees knocked down livestock fences) and lots of debris in pastures.

I am some 35 miles NE of the true damage in Moore and Oklahoma City, so I must be thankful . . .

To my issue. The nearly new "three tab" shingle roof is trashed on both houses here. The roof "looks" OK, but the adjusters did not need to see my pictures of the hail. They saw enough damage evidence on the roofs and have totaled them. The hail crushed the shingles where it hit and in a few years they will start to disintegrate.

Now what to do . . . The cost of commercially replacing the roof with equivalent shingles is about $250/square (1 sq = 100 sq feet). The insurance company requires that the old shingles and underlayment be torn off to expose the roof decking. So this number for "tear off" is in that quote. I will not get that entire $ amount as there is depreciation and the deductible.

I can't just cash the check or the insurance company will later cancel my insurance. They will not insure house contents with an existing bad roof. And there are many hundreds of pock marks from the hail, so it is not a patch job either.

Replacement with a metal roof is very tempting. The use of thicker 26 G metal (as opposed to the thinner 29 G) is wise. And a metal roof gives me ~ a 25% discount on my annual insurance bill.

But the cost to do this is about double ($400/sq) that of a three tab ($250/sq). Here is the question. Metal material cost (panels, screws, trim, etc.) is about $160-$180/sq and I can put the metal roof on top of the single layer of damaged shingles (no tear off needed).

How hard is it to put up an "R panel" type metal roof? I have read the internet sites, but am wondering if any on the site have tackled this? I have not.

Thanks in advance.

Steve

__________________
consulting on geothermal heating/cooling & rational energy use since 1990

Last edited by stevehull; 06-02-13 at 06:36 AM..
stevehull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-13, 12:32 PM   #2
greif
a van down by the river
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Kaukauna,WI
Posts: 108
Thanks: 6
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Default

I always wondered why the steel roofing was so much more, especially the shed style roofing as that goes on fast so labor should be less. I love the look of the raised rib style.

Around here in the Appleton /Green Bay area of WI I see more and more roofs replaced with the r style - shed style roof and they look good. I have not used this but don't think it should be hard as you can get cut to length pieces. I know people who have built sheds and they say not to cut it with saw as the edges can then rust. I think you should tear off old so you can get it to sit good and flat on sheeting. I wonder if it is noisy in the rain as I know my dads sheds are but that is without wood sheeting/ attic.

Reduce ins cost is great too.

Good luck
__________________
Gary R

If you want total security, go to prison. There you're fed, clothed, given medical care and so on. The only thing lacking... is freedom. ― Dwight D. Eisenhower
greif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-13, 07:05 PM   #3
jeff5may
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: elizabethtown, ky, USA
Posts: 2,394
Thanks: 410
Thanked 604 Times in 506 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to jeff5may
Default

Metal roofing is a once-in-a-lifetime event, asphalt shingling is not. Steel roofing goes on just about the same as vinyl siding. As with many home improvements, the devil is in the details. The seams, flashing, caps, trim and such are the only part you could consider challenging. The bulk of the roof goes on quick and easy by either directly fastening it to your existing old roof or by laying down purlins and fastening the metal roofing to the purlins. Of course, you could tear off your old shingles, or add insulation, or make other upgrades (venting, skylights, new underlayment, etc) before installing the metal roofing if you desire. The main idea is get it right, because the metal roof will likely live longer than you will.
jeff5may is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 12:15 AM   #4
Ryland
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Wisconsin.
Posts: 913
Thanks: 127
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

The only metal roofs that I've found to be loud are in pole sheds where you are looking at the underside of the steel, I work in a metal building with insulation and it's very quite and put metal shingles on a handful of houses and they are quite as well, even my parent barn is quite because the metal is over a layer of asphalt shingles.
It sounds like your insurance savings alone will make a metal roof worth while if you stay there for 10 years or so and even if you sell it will add enough value on to your house that it will have been a worth while investment.
Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 08:39 AM   #5
AC_Hacker
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
AC_Hacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,002
Thanks: 303
Thanked 712 Times in 532 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryland View Post
The only metal roofs that I've found to be loud are in pole sheds where you are looking at the underside of the steel, I work in a metal building with insulation and it's very quite and put metal shingles on a handful of houses and they are quite as well, even my parent barn is quite because the metal is over a layer of asphalt shingles.
I put aluminum shingles on over a cedar shingle roof, with skip sheathing below that and about 6 inches of rigid foam below that.

In all honesty, I have to say that my metal roof is not nearly as quiet as composition roofing. In a heavy large-drop rain, you can hear the individual rain drops when they hit the aluminum... Pat, pat, pat has become tink, tink, tink.

Having said that, there is no way that I'd ever go back to another composition roof.

* * *

I have thought a lot about if I had it to do over again, what I might do differently... and especially since the life of a metal roof is so long, and you don't need to worry about subsequent layers of careless nails being driven in over the roof assembly, I really wish I had put PEX under the metal roof, on the sunny faces of the roof, to capture some of the sun's heat energy. It would have been invisible, easy, cheap and safe from damage and deterioration. By now, I would have enjoyed more than 15 years of free water pre-heat... and the accompanying cooling effect in the summer.

Best,

-AC
__________________
I'm not an HVAC technician. In fact, I'm barely even a hacker...

Last edited by AC_Hacker; 06-03-13 at 08:43 AM..
AC_Hacker is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to AC_Hacker For This Useful Post:
Mobile Master Tech (06-05-13)
Old 06-03-13, 01:15 PM   #6
TimJFowler
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
TimJFowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Santa Fe, NM
Posts: 184
Thanks: 9
Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehull View Post
Replacement with a metal roof is very tempting. The use of thicker 26 G metal (as opposed to the thinner 29 G) is wise. And a metal roof gives me ~ a 25% discount on my annual insurance bill.

But the cost to do this is about double ($400/sq) that of a three tab ($250/sq). Here is the question. Metal material cost (panels, screws, trim, etc.) is about $160-$180/sq and I can put the metal roof on top of the single layer of damaged shingles (no tear off needed).

How hard is it to put up an "R panel" type metal roof? I have read the internet sites, but am wondering if any on the site have tackled this? I have not.
We have a metal ~"pro-panel" roof http://ecorenovator.org/forum/renova...t-shingle.html and have been VERY happy with it. We paid a pro to install the roof, so I can't comment on how hard it is to do. We also had the old asphalt shingles stripped off, but that was for necessary roof deck repairs.

But, I am sold on the benefits of a metal roof:
  • Durability - 25 years+
  • Cool Roof - We chose the "galvalume" finish which is a cool roof color (there are many other "cool" colors). The roofer installed a ridge vent and I added insulation trays to the eave vents which help keep roof deck cool above the attic insulation.
  • Rainwater collection - Metal roofs are non-toxic and shed nearly 100% of rainwater for collection.
  • Look - We like the look, but that is certainly subjective.

Living in tornado alley and with hot OK summers, I would think that a cool metal roof would be a worthwhile investment if you intend to stay in the house. Use the DOE Cool Roof Calculator for Low-Slope or Flat Roofs to get an estimate of what a cool roof could save you in cooling costs.

FWIW,
Tim
__________________
- DIY Adventures in Applied Sustainability -

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by TimJFowler; 06-03-13 at 01:20 PM..
TimJFowler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-13, 03:44 PM   #7
vmike
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Stillwater, OK
Posts: 26
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

I'm also in Oklahoma, I put a metal roof on over ten years ago. I would not go back. My house had 3/4 shake shingles, been on there since the house was built in 62 without a problem, after a large hail storm they could take no more. The cost to replace the shakes was $20K the crooks, excuse me the insurance company would allow me $5100 because of the age of the roof. I managed to do the entire roof with trim for just under $5K. I stripped the shakes and put a single layer of thirty pound felt under the tin, it's pretty quiet. I did my moms little house in tin after the same hail storm, screwed 1x4s to the asphalt shingle roof and the tin to those. It's also pretty quiet. Both roofs have endured several hail storms in the intervening years without damage. Both are 29 gauge. As a side note, I recycled the shakes through my woodstove for heat.

mike
__________________
I tried to contain myself, but I escaped.
vmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-13, 12:41 PM   #8
Mobile Master Tech
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
Mobile Master Tech's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 142
Thanks: 38
Thanked 40 Times in 33 Posts
Default

Although I feel metal roofing is best and is effectively a once-in-a-lifetime event, good quality asphalt roofing is a twice-in-a-lifetime event at half the price, and I like the quiet.

I installed the only no-extra-cost Energy Star non-white roof detailed IN THIS THREAD. There may be other no/low cost options available now, but I am pleased since I couldn't have a metal roof and it made a huge difference in the heat.

I would assume that except for standing-seam metal roofs, an asphalt roof is easiest and most flexible for mounting solar collectors. Anyone have comparative mounting experience on different roof types?

Craig
__________________
"Id put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we dont have to
wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that." Thomas Edison, 1847 1931
Mobile Master Tech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-13, 01:12 PM   #9
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

I wanted a steel roof so bad but "she who must be obeyed" objected to the cost and we went asphalt......bummer. I have to deal with this for every decision about the house (unless I don't tell her). Given where you are, I would get the most hail proof roof you can get and do it yourself to save money.
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-13, 04:40 PM   #10
randen
Uber EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Strathroy Ontario Canada
Posts: 654
Thanks: 9
Thanked 182 Times in 127 Posts
Default No asphalt shingles here thanks

The shop I had constructed in 1987 with the cheapest barn steel roof is still holding back the weather. With the corrigations the roof isn't noisy (I had lived in the upper messinan above the offices while building a new house.) Right next to the roof. A good position to qualify any noise during rainstorms.

If I had asphalt shingled the shop roof I'd be considering the third roof.

My neighbor is on their fourth roof since I've had this property. Everyone seems to go through those calculations one metal roof that will last FOREVER. or asphalt. We all seem to want to recycle, reduce landfill waste etc. but that landfill we routinely call roofing should be seriouslly considered. Stop the cycle!!!

I have helped friends shingle their roofs. That case of beer and hot dogs are not worth it And to have to think, we'll need renew the friendship in another 10-15yrs.

There are a few good options aluminum/steel PVC and composite materials. Some with life spans garanteed 100 yrs. I saw aluminum roofing shingles with a sound damping material on the reverse side finished in a copper coloured anodizing. Wow that looked great!!

Even some of the high rib barn steel looks good. I have seen it on some homes and it would be quiet reasonable cost wise. And that barn steel should last the life of the house.

I couldn't believe my eyes this spring a century home with slate roofing being removed and asphalt shingles being installed. What a sin. Replacing a slate roof that had stood 100 yrs. to a asphalt shingle that might last 15 yrs. Why wouldn't they just repair that beautiful slate.???

My home is very unique for this area. I have a flat roof. Its a white welded PVC membrane. 40 yr warrenty. The roof is actually sloped toward the centre and thats were the rain water is collected and drained with a 6" dia tube running in the truss void down inside the wall and out to the field drain. The tube is not visable. If someone desired ,you could collect the water in a large cistern and it would be potable (soft water no conditioning required). There are no gutters to maintain. The interior collection is likely cheaper to install than gutters and down pipe. Another plus to this roof is being white its cool in the summer saves on the airconditioning.

I was on the roof a couple months ago checking the solar panels and the roof looks as good as the day it was installed 15 yrs ago. If it was asphalt I would be thinking about replacing it.

IMHO asphalt shingles are landfill, just a (cheap) short term solution to protect our largest and most longterm investment, our homes!!

Randen


Last edited by randen; 06-08-13 at 04:51 PM.. Reason: punctuation
randen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
metal roof, r panel

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design