EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Conservation
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-07-15, 10:49 AM   #21
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,482
Thanks: 1,117
Thanked 370 Times in 301 Posts
Default

Mikesolar, any updates on the house?

__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-15, 11:45 AM   #22
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

Haha, got a big hole in the front of the house

Putting in a new bay window, the old one was painted shut single glazed with a storm. The previous owners were smokers so I guess they didn't value fresh air.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	front window1.jpg
Views:	222
Size:	216.7 KB
ID:	6023  
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mikesolar For This Useful Post:
Daox (10-07-15)
Old 10-07-15, 06:15 PM   #23
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

More stuff. The pump on the 4 year old mid efficiency boiler is an Armstrong pump which draws 3.3A. I'm getting rid of the red beast and putting in the Taco Bumblebee which uses around 20w. A no brainer for sure and I will reuse it when I change to the high efficiency boiler.

Little room off the main house had no insulation in the walls, all single glazed windows and a HUGE fin tube radiator which may not have even kept up with the heat loss. New windows, spray foam everywhere and a new Stelrad (much more efficient).







Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151007_190605.jpg
Views:	319
Size:	165.2 KB
ID:	6024   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151007_190543.jpg
Views:	327
Size:	180.6 KB
ID:	6025   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151007_190512.jpg
Views:	333
Size:	140.2 KB
ID:	6026   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151007_190506.jpg
Views:	321
Size:	110.9 KB
ID:	6027  

Last edited by Daox; 10-07-15 at 07:38 PM..
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mikesolar For This Useful Post:
Daox (10-07-15)
Old 10-07-15, 07:39 PM   #24
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,482
Thanks: 1,117
Thanked 370 Times in 301 Posts
Default

I've not heard of the Taco bumblebee. Can you tell us a bit more about it?
__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-15, 08:32 PM   #25
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

The bumblebee is an ECM pump where the control is designed to have a fixed dT (20F for example) which means that if you have 2 or 3 or more zones with zone valves, the pumps will increase or decrease the flow rate to provide the constant dT. The power it uses will decrease as needed. A regular pump will have a much higher power demand under a lot of these conditions. The Grundfos Alpha is similar except that it tries to match a design pressure drop instead of dT. This may be more important in Europe where they sometimes use really small copper tube to go to radiators (such as 5mm tube). We don't do this. I have used lots of Alpha pumps but it is my first time using this pumps so we will see how it will work.
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mikesolar For This Useful Post:
Daox (10-07-15)
Old 10-07-15, 08:39 PM   #26
pinballlooking
Super Moderator
 
pinballlooking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SC
Posts: 2,843
Thanks: 166
Thanked 541 Times in 444 Posts
Default

I like this pump. I will have to check back down the road to see how you like it.
pinballlooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-15, 03:19 AM   #27
Zwerius
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Zwerius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 63
Thanks: 12
Thanked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikesolar View Post
This may be more important in Europe where they sometimes use really small copper tube to go to radiators (such as 5mm tube).
I live in Europe (The Netherlands) and I never heard of that small size tubing going to radiators. Minimum size I now is 15 mm (O.D.).
Zwerius is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-15, 05:33 AM   #28
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

The Brits used it. It was called Microbore (?) or something like it. It might have been 8mm but 15mm is normal here (5/8")
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-15, 01:41 PM   #29
Ormston
Apprentice EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: UK
Posts: 131
Thanks: 13
Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikesolar View Post
The Brits used it. It was called Microbore (?) or something like it. It might have been 8mm but 15mm is normal here (5/8")
Yes we call it Microbore, 8mm OD used to be common.
Generally 10mm OD minimum now although mostly 15mm, 8mm and i guess 10mm to a lesser degree has a tendency to become blocked with sludge in older systems. May not be such an issue with modern pressurised systems ?

Steve
Ormston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-15, 07:59 PM   #30
Mikesolar
Master EcoRenovator
 
Mikesolar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 958
Thanks: 40
Thanked 158 Times in 150 Posts
Default

Added new front door. As insulated and efficient as I could get for the budget. The old one leaked like a sieve.


Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	new front door.jpg
Views:	275
Size:	167.0 KB
ID:	6152  

Last edited by Daox; 10-23-15 at 09:48 PM..
Mikesolar is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design