EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Conservation
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-18-15, 09:04 AM   #11
bennelson
Home-Wrecker
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 545
Thanks: 3
Thanked 164 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
since the solar screen is tucked....may that cause water to seep in
That's one thing I wanted to figure out, but I don't think it will at all. The window has a significant lip, with the top piece extending over the bottom.

Rain would have to magically go down, around the top piece of trim, loop back up OVER the bottom piece of trim, and then into the interior. That's not to say it can't happen - capillary action, for example, can make water travel weird directions. It's fiberglass screen, so it shouldn't absorb water.

Also, the material is very thin, so it pinches in the window just fine.

The main downside of this setup is that I can't crank the skylight open for ventilation. However, that room also has two regular windows, which I can open.

And again, this is a temporary, experimental setup.
I'm really impressed with how much it cuts down on that hot sunlight entering the house.

The only downside I've noticed so far is that on an overcast day, the solar screen makes the light coming through the skylight seem even gloomier.

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bennelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-15, 11:34 PM   #12
Piwoslaw
Super Moderator
 
Piwoslaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 920
Thanks: 170
Thanked 93 Times in 77 Posts
Default

My house doesn't have any skylights, but many years ago I thought of installing one. That didn't happen for a number of reasons, but I did think about solar gain then and came up with the following idea:
Mount a mirror vertically on the south edge of the skylight, shading it from direct sunlight, but reflecting indirect light from the north.
During the colder months flip the mirror to the skylight's northern edge facing south, reflecting additional sunlight, and partially shading it from northern winds and snow.

This would require access twice a year, and the mirror would have to withstand wind, but it would decrease solar gain in the summer without decreasing light too much, while increasing light and heat in the winter.
__________________
Ecorenovation - the bottomless piggy bank that tries to tame the energy hog.
Piwoslaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-15, 01:15 AM   #13
AC_Hacker
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
AC_Hacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,001
Thanks: 303
Thanked 702 Times in 525 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
My house doesn't have any skylights, but many years ago I thought of installing one. That didn't happen for a number of reasons, but I did think about solar gain then and came up with the following idea:
Mount a mirror vertically on the south edge of the skylight, shading it from direct sunlight, but reflecting indirect light from the north.
During the colder months flip the mirror to the skylight's northern edge facing south, reflecting additional sunlight, and partially shading it from northern winds and snow.

This would require access twice a year, and the mirror would have to withstand wind, but it would decrease solar gain in the summer without decreasing light too much, while increasing light and heat in the winter.
The idea strikes me as unnecessarily complex, then again, maybe it's just the complex explanation of why a simple idea could work.

But to keep on with your idea... a series of reflective louvers, like venetian blinds, could keep a low profile and give you the effect you have described.

-AC
__________________
I'm not an HVAC technician. In fact, I'm barely even a hacker...
AC_Hacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-15, 01:24 PM   #14
AirSepTech
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Elko,Nv.& Boise,Id.
Posts: 19
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via Yahoo to AirSepTech
Default The "EASY" way

Skylights, windows, even the patio.

I used window screen frames, custom made to fit my junk.

I put whatever material in I think will get me what I want.

So summer is a framed screen on the entire window, not just the opening sash

Some are held on with clips, some, 2 side 3m tape.

I even used the framing material to build up solid acrylic panels, 2side tape to hold 2 panels to the frame, a cheap double glazed panel.

Try it, you will come up with some great ideas/fixes.
AirSepTech is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to AirSepTech For This Useful Post:
AC_Hacker (06-23-15)
Old 07-15-15, 10:21 AM   #15
BioBob
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Mass.
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I used some of that solar screen on the inside, to cut the extreme glare of sun that comes in during Summer days.. It's blinding otherwise.. I just made a lightweight frame from window screen framing material I had and the bottom of our skylights had a wooden rim around them that it attaches easily to. I just used a couple push pins or similar because I take it down in Fall, for more light. I'm sure my way traps heat inside the skylight tube, but I really don't like getting on the back side of my roof where the skylights are; too steep and high for me. BTW, I also did the same thing with screen frame and that clear "Shrink film" to put up in Winter, and that seems to help a lot. The bathroom definitely stays warmer with that in. The nice thing is I can change over from one to the other quickly and easily, from inside. It's not as good as you guys' ideas, but it works for me..
BioBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-15, 10:33 AM   #16
bennelson
Home-Wrecker
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 545
Thanks: 3
Thanked 164 Times in 96 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AirSepTech View Post
...I used window screen frames, custom made to fit my junk...
AirSepTech, are these interior or EXTERIOR mounted frames that you are using?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bennelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-15, 05:58 PM   #17
Nonhog
Knows enough to be danger
 
Nonhog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Washington state
Posts: 24
Thanks: 5
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Hits home! I added a sun shade "sail" to cover my atrium skylights 15x15.
W/O it even with the new heat pump the room is unbearable.
Glad I added it early this year with all the 80-90 degree weather in the Seattle area.
Add pics later..........

Now you have me thinking about the little skylights we have (3)
Nonhog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-15, 09:02 AM   #18
bennelson
Home-Wrecker
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 545
Thanks: 3
Thanked 164 Times in 96 Posts
Default

I was also wondering if a "hair-net" might work for some applications.

Imagine solar screening with a hemmed edge with an elastic shock cord inside. It could be put over a skylight, then tightened on with the shock cord. Simple, soft, light-weight.

It would require that the skylight has some sort of a lip on it though. So, it might work on some but not others.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bennelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-15, 11:23 AM   #19
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,427
Thanks: 1,077
Thanked 358 Times in 293 Posts
Default

Have you noticed a difference in your electric use / bill with the shading?
__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-15, 08:08 AM   #20
bennelson
Home-Wrecker
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 545
Thanks: 3
Thanked 164 Times in 96 Posts
Default

I feels much cooler in the room that I have shaded.

That one room is not what we base the use of our central air conditioning on, so it hasn't changed our electric use, but comfort is greatly improved.

__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bennelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
screen, shade, skylight, solar

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design