EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Appliances & Gadgets
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-26-13, 08:13 AM   #141
gener
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Bg
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Hello there, I just took out the motor from an old washing machine, but it seems too weak...

/watch?v=I4TrDFdxbj8

gener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-13, 11:01 AM   #142
MetroMPG
Infrequent noob
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: 1000 Islands region, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 399
Thanks: 28
Thanked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Default

Isn't a washing machine motor AC? If I'm not mistaken, you would have to rectify the output to create DC. You may also have to energize the field coil to get current out. (I may be wrong - I'm rusty on AC motors.)

I used a DC permanent magnet motor. Much easier to work with.
__________________
.

  • To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  • To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  • To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  • To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  • To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
MetroMPG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-13, 10:17 PM   #143
gener
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Bg
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Yes it is AC, 120 W. It only gave some feedback when I measured it with the 20 V DC range of the mmeter. (I`m pretty green when it comes to el. engineering)

If I continue working on this (rectifying it, etc...) could I make it generate close to 40 W power?
gener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-13, 08:07 AM   #144
Xringer
Lex Parsimoniae
 
Xringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Woburn, MA
Posts: 4,847
Thanks: 105
Thanked 241 Times in 222 Posts
Default

See:
Electric generator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Read about Alternator & Excitation.

It seems like you need two independent windings to make power without using permanent magnets.




A DC motor is also a DC generator and would be the best way to go..
__________________
My hobby is installing & trying to repair mini-splits
EPA 608 Type 1 Technician Certification ~ 5 lbs or less..
Xringer is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Xringer For This Useful Post:
MetroMPG (10-29-13)
Old 10-27-13, 08:25 AM   #145
gener
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Bg
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

The closest thing I found on YT matching my generator was some guy`s AC ceiling fan motor (his - 60W, mine 120W). which he converted to DC with spinning permanent magnets around.

What kind of rating should those magnets have?
What kind of diodes should I use for the rectifier?

Inside the junk of the washing machine I found 6 mf, 600 V capacitor, I`m going to use that to smoothen the dc voltage.
gener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-13, 11:20 AM   #146
Xringer
Lex Parsimoniae
 
Xringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Woburn, MA
Posts: 4,847
Thanks: 105
Thanked 241 Times in 222 Posts
Default

That's called a Starter Cap, IIRC..
I think it would take a lot of work to convert a washer motor into a generator.

I once salvaged a washer motor. I looked at the wiring diagram and found it had two speeds.
I used it to power a dual-speed drill press for about 10 years. Very useful and reliable motor. People use washer motors to power all sorts of shop tools.
When I replaced my DIY drill press with a Chinese drill-mill, I dumped the old one
on the curb and it was gone within minutes.
But, when I looked at my new drill-mill, the motor looked identical! (My Chinese band saw has the same motor too)!


There seems to be a lot of people using DC generators on bikes..

Low-tech Magazine: Bike powered electricity generators are not sustainable


If your motor is like this one, Induction Motor How it works - YouTube
Then you would need to remove the rotor and replace it with a spinning PM..
Seems like a lot of work to me..
__________________
My hobby is installing & trying to repair mini-splits
EPA 608 Type 1 Technician Certification ~ 5 lbs or less..

Last edited by Xringer; 10-27-13 at 12:07 PM..
Xringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-13, 09:26 PM   #147
jeff5may
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: elizabethtown, ky, USA
Posts: 2,306
Thanks: 353
Thanked 578 Times in 483 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to jeff5may
Default

Ok, for a good motor to turn into a generator (for this application), a couple of generic motor types come to mind:

simple, permanent magnet type:

1. Drive motor from an old treadmill
2. Heater blower or windshield wiper motor from car or truck
3. Power wheels or electric scooter drive motor

More efficient, more complicated, brushless DC motors:
1. Laser printer or copier drive motor
2. ebay "servo motor", VCR capstan motor
3. More complicated, but cheaper hacks(ceiling fan, dishwasher,direct-drive clothes washer, etc.)of AC motors
4. Any industrial 3-phase synchronous motor

The items towards the top of the list are pretty much plug-and-play devices. As you go further down the list, more and more support circuitry is needed, or you must modify the motor to make it a generator, or both. The payoff for complexity is smoother operation over a wider rpm range and/or higher efficiency.

Last edited by jeff5may; 10-29-13 at 08:30 PM..
jeff5may is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jeff5may For This Useful Post:
MetroMPG (10-29-13)
Old 11-16-13, 10:44 AM   #148
jeff5may
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: elizabethtown, ky, USA
Posts: 2,306
Thanks: 353
Thanked 578 Times in 483 Posts
Send a message via Yahoo to jeff5may
Default

Gener,
Is this your video?

This setup uses the drive motor out of a Fisher and Paykel washer. It looks to be a brushless-DC-type motor, with over a dozen poles and permanent magnets. Nothing like the run-of-the mill induction motors found in most American designs.

Last edited by jeff5may; 11-17-13 at 05:48 PM.. Reason: words.
jeff5may is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-13, 11:45 AM   #149
NiHaoMike
Supreme EcoRenovator
 
NiHaoMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,096
Thanks: 14
Thanked 241 Times in 227 Posts
Default

A permanent magnet alternator (not most automotive alternators) is ideal. I got mine at a surplus store many years ago (I think it was intended for wind power, got it at some crazy low price like $15), boosted the efficiency by swapping the ordinary diodes for some Schottkys out of old PC power supplies. Synchronous rectification would be even more efficient but orders of magnitude more complex.

If the load is 120V, a high voltage alternator would make more sense. Twibright Exciter If the load is mechanical in nature, a direct mechanical connection (if you can match it up well enough) would be best although that's often not possible. But for low voltage loads like electronics, a low voltage alternator makes the most sense.

Something else to consider is MPPT. Like solar and wind, you have to match the effective source impedance for best efficiency. But neither solar nor wind MPPT controllers would work with a bicycle since the source characteristics are different. DIY is really the only option there. I had to do it as part of my senior design project (along with the grid tie inverter), but it was very difficult to make an algorithm that remained stable over a wide range of inputs. For example, my first implementation (try to hold input voltage at about 16V or so, but decrease the limit down to 10V in order to hold a 3A minimum current) worked great when I tested it, but oscillated wildly when my friend Sarah tested it.
__________________
To my surprise, shortly after Naomi Wu gave me a bit of fame for making good use of solar power, Allie Moore got really jealous of her...
NiHaoMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-19, 07:05 PM   #150
Bicycle Bob
Suncatcher
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Spiritwood, Northern Saskatchewan
Posts: 41
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

I like building with available parts, so when I needed an exercycle, I made a 2 X 4 into a stand that barely lifts the back wheel on my regular bike, supported by the chainstays. A strap over the carrier, tightened with wedges, keeps it secure. Hinged to this base is an arm with the heater blower motor from a car, driven by a small roller that is spun by the wheel. A bungee cord supplies the force for traction. A motley collection of 12V lights and accessories provides the ultimate resistance. I turned the roller from plywood using a disk sander to true it up, with the motor energized as such one last time.
I have found that I get a better workout listing to lively music than watching movies, although I didn't try "Breaking Away."

Bicycle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
bike, generator, pedal

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design