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Old 07-10-20, 02:30 AM   #11
WyrTwister
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Originally Posted by nokiasixteth View Post
Its like a year old . But i installed my self. The guys who are on the page are absolutely not a lick of help . Only pc board i have found was around 350. THinking its time to youtube and figure out how to replace parts on that board . Thats lot higher than i want to spend.
$ 350 is about what the motherboard of our mini split cost . Ordered it from the supply house I purchased the mini split from .

I took the old one out , installed the new one . Took the old one back to the supply house I purchased the mini split from and the refunded my money . Less than 1 year old & under warranty .

God bless
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Old 07-22-20, 12:01 AM   #12
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Go with good quality (e.g. Kester) 63/37 leaded solder. Lead free is harder to work with so I do not recommend it for a beginner. For the iron, go for the TS100 if you want one that's portable or a T12 if you want a budget option.

Practice a bit on a scrap board, but it looks like a pretty easy soldering job.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/2in1-862D-S...53.m1438.l2649

Think a hot gun and soldering iron would come in handy for desoldering things in combination with the soldering iron. Or is that a garbage unit combo . Really not many reviews on youtube i seen as a quick search.

I did find the Ksger t12 . I assumed that was one you had recomended .

https://www.ebay.com/itm/KSGER-T12-M...53.m2763.l2649
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Old 07-22-20, 09:30 AM   #13
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The first one will also do surface mount reflow (an advanced process), but I'm not sure about the overall build quality. Might be worth considering if you're planning to do more advanced electronics in the future.

The second one should be decent, but I have seen the more popular TS100 for not much more.
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Old 07-23-20, 02:22 AM   #14
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For what it's worth, I have a gaggle of teensy soldering stuff for electronics. My go to is the Weller. All the super pro somewhat expert peanuts have their gadgets of the day, but guess what? Weller wtcp series works for me and lots of pros that actually fix a lotta stuff. Old blue still kicking, manufactured 1973. I have a couple of tc202 stations as well. All the irons work with all the stations. Tc201. All the tips work with all the irons. Twisty knob and LCD control gimmicky stuff not for me. The tips have a number on the shank that tells the heat. Number 7, 700 degrees. Number 5, 500 degrees. Weller makes every kind of soldering iron tip you could imagine for the tc201.

Hot air stations: you get what you pay for. If you're not fixing phones or MacBooks and don't have a microscope, forget it.

For your board, a 12 dollar iron, some tip tinner (sal ammoniac), solder with lead, a small roll of chem-wick rosin, and some 91 percent alcohol for cleaning should do you. Maybe an xacto knife for scraping and cutting.

To be honest, an xacto knife is my favorite surface mount component removal tool. If it has 4 or less terminals, a little poking and prodding makes itty bitty sand based lifeforms disappear. Micro tiny surface mounted sand is the main reason I got out of consumer electronic repair.

Last edited by jeff5may; 07-23-20 at 02:44 AM.. Reason: Updated dead links
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Old 07-31-20, 08:39 AM   #15
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I had a similar problem on a garage door opener that I tried to repair for a customer. He had shorted the light socket and melted some traces. I repaired the traces using thin wire, however, The relay contacts had also welded and I had to pry them open for the relay to function. I can't tell from your photos if a relay is present but it may also be a problem. Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 08-07-20, 10:43 PM   #16
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The iron i was using i wasnt able to remove any of the solder . Guess probably me just being a novice with that station i got it off with a soldering sucker to. I wish i could find a pic of it online of that board to make sure i dont have more solder somewhere that it shouldnt be when it dripped down my board but im not sure what i need to look for.


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Originally Posted by jeff5may View Post
For what it's worth, I have a gaggle of teensy soldering stuff for electronics. My go to is the Weller. All the super pro somewhat expert peanuts have their gadgets of the day, but guess what? Weller wtcp series works for me and lots of pros that actually fix a lotta stuff. Old blue still kicking, manufactured 1973. I have a couple of tc202 stations as well. All the irons work with all the stations. Tc201. All the tips work with all the irons. Twisty knob and LCD control gimmicky stuff not for me. The tips have a number on the shank that tells the heat. Number 7, 700 degrees. Number 5, 500 degrees. Weller makes every kind of soldering iron tip you could imagine for the tc201.

Hot air stations: you get what you pay for. If you're not fixing phones or MacBooks and don't have a microscope, forget it.

For your board, a 12 dollar iron, some tip tinner (sal ammoniac), solder with lead, a small roll of chem-wick rosin, and some 91 percent alcohol for cleaning should do you. Maybe an xacto knife for scraping and cutting.

To be honest, an xacto knife is my favorite surface mount component removal tool. If it has 4 or less terminals, a little poking and prodding makes itty bitty sand based lifeforms disappear. Micro tiny surface mounted sand is the main reason I got out of consumer electronic repair.
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Old 08-12-20, 09:25 PM   #17
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The other wire of the fuse holder will attach to the board above the triangle with the exclamation point. I would attach it to the siver terminal above where the burnt trace is. Again, make a solder blob, then attach the wire to the blob.


The spots in the red is where i tried to solder . It didnt seem to want to stick . I had to put a substantial blob. The black circle kinda in the middle of that solder stuff is that a better spot to solder ? . This circuit board i have no clue what goes where.
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Old 08-16-20, 10:11 AM   #18
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Yes, the spot with the black circle is a good place to attach one wire of the fuse holder. Just apply the heat to the terminal until it melts, it probably has unleaded solder in the board. The unleaded solder has a higher melting point. Once you add some lead solder, it will lower the melting point and be easier to work with.

The other wire of the fuse holder can go on the red circled terminal or the circuit trace next to the terminal. First, you need to clean up the area. It's all black with carbon from burning and arcs. Use 91 percent alcohol and a brush, and some flux if you have any. Once the area is clean, you can melt some solder onto the terminal and then remove it with desoldering wick or a solder sucker. If you want to attach the wire to the trace, just scrape the green paint off the top with an xacto knife or a pocket knife. Shine the copper trace up with alcohol and a pencil eraser. Adda little flux to the spot and hit it with a tinned iron. The solder should stick quickly to the bare trace. If not, clean again and add more flux.
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Old 10-28-20, 01:05 PM   #19
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I believe that i failed that little exp . I put in a straight wire in and still only the fan on the inside would come on




Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff5may View Post
Yes, the spot with the black circle is a good place to attach one wire of the fuse holder. Just apply the heat to the terminal until it melts, it probably has unleaded solder in the board. The unleaded solder has a higher melting point. Once you add some lead solder, it will lower the melting point and be easier to work with.

The other wire of the fuse holder can go on the red circled terminal or the circuit trace next to the terminal. First, you need to clean up the area. It's all black with carbon from burning and arcs. Use 91 percent alcohol and a brush, and some flux if you have any. Once the area is clean, you can melt some solder onto the terminal and then remove it with desoldering wick or a solder sucker. If you want to attach the wire to the trace, just scrape the green paint off the top with an xacto knife or a pocket knife. Shine the copper trace up with alcohol and a pencil eraser. Adda little flux to the spot and hit it with a tinned iron. The solder should stick quickly to the bare trace. If not, clean again and add more flux.

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