EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Appliances & Gadgets
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-09-12, 06:11 AM   #1
Solar
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 77
Thanks: 2
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Exclamation A car for the rich conservatsionist

invisible to the environment and you!
Invisible Mercedes brings James Bond technology to life | Motoramic - Yahoo! Autos

i will forgive the Germans for WW2 because of this diddy
In a promotion for its first production fuel-cell vehicle in Germany, Mercedes-Benz turned a B-Class hatchback invisible -- at least, from a distance, using the same idea behind the invisible car in the James Bond film "Die Another Day." See if you can see it before it sees you.

The invisibility cloak had its tryout this week on the streets of Stuttgart, Germany. To make Q's idea of an invisible car real, Mercedes employed dozens of technicians and some $263,000 worth of flexible LED mats covering one side of the car. Using a camera mounted on the opposite side of the vehicle, the LEDs were programmed to reproduce the image from the camera at the right scale, blending the vehicle into the background from a few feet away. Doing so required power sources, computers and other gear totaling 1,100 lbs. of equipment inside the B-Class.

Mercedes' point was to show how the F-Cell hydrogen fuel cell powered car would be invisible to the environment, producing only water vapor and heat for emissions. For an invisible car, it's getting a lot of stares.

__________________
My Climate Change Blog
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Global Warming News - The Global Warming Times - Videos, Science, Solutions, Activism
Solar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-12, 06:59 AM   #2
Daox
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 5,482
Thanks: 1,117
Thanked 370 Times in 301 Posts
Default

Didn't read the link, but I'd rather have an electric car. The whole point being where does hydrogen come from? They get it either from natural gas (a fossil fuel) or electricity by electrolizing water. Either method is inferior to just using batteries to store electricity which has numerous renewable sources. You could use RE energy to electrolize water, but that just adds an extra step and another efficiency loss.
__________________
Current project -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
&
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Daox is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:
Ryland (03-09-12)
Old 03-09-12, 08:35 AM   #3
Ryland
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Wisconsin.
Posts: 913
Thanks: 127
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

I agree with Daox, while the cloaking device is neat, I like my electric vehicles to be more efficient, if you produce hydrogen from electricity then the plug to wheel watt hours per mile are going to be nearly 3 times what an electric vehicle using lead acid or lithium batteries, that is a big part of why extracting hydrogen from fossil fuels is popular, skip the burning of the fuel and just use the part you want.
Anyone know what you do with the left over carbon and other by products when you remove the hydrogen from a hydrocarbon?
Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-12, 12:55 PM   #4
strider3700
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Vancouver Island BC
Posts: 745
Thanks: 23
Thanked 37 Times in 30 Posts
Default

Iceland has a glut of water and electricity. They are hoping to produce hydrogen and ship it worldwide becoming the saudi arabia of the 21st century. There is lots of places that have excess electricity at various times of the day that could be used to make hydrogen. right now the market for it just isn't there though so the initial investment on setting up hasn't happened either. I see that as the biggest problem with the tech.
strider3700 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-12, 01:21 PM   #5
MN Renovator
Less usage=Cheaper bills
 
MN Renovator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 938
Thanks: 41
Thanked 115 Times in 89 Posts
Default

If I were a rich conservationist I would buy a house with a whole bunch of land and line my land with solar, maybe over multiple properties and grid tie it. If its in an area with good net metering laws where you get paid at the rate that customers get charged(its this way in MN) and the electricity is very expensive(not too expensive here tho), you would be rich to buy the panels but then they would eventually pay themselves off and become an income source. Doing this on multiple properties spaced far apart would allow for a disaster like a tornado to come through and not wipe the panels all out.

...then just run the car from your solar panels. You could drive a Hummer or Escalade EV and not feel so bad about it because you generated that electricity and also the revenue that the solar panel companies got probably helped their R&D to develop better and cheaper panels to be sold to more people than would otherwise buy them.
MN Renovator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-12, 02:39 PM   #6
Ryland
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Wisconsin.
Posts: 913
Thanks: 127
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by strider3700 View Post
Iceland has a glut of water and electricity. They are hoping to produce hydrogen and ship it worldwide becoming the saudi arabia of the 21st century.
Half of the energy in a tank of hydrogen is used in compressing it, you would almost be better off compressing air (doesn't leak out of the tank as fast) and the equipment to use compressed air is much cheaper and lasts longer then fuel cells.
Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-12, 06:57 PM   #7
AlanE
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 91
Thanks: 6
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

This car would be GREAT for speed and red light cameras - be invisible to the camera and the camera shoots for a photo but captures the image of the car behind you superimposed onto all of the sensors affixed to your car.

As for hydrogen the real tricky issue is how to transport it - pipelines have to deal with the hardening effect that hydrogen has on the metal, liquefying the hydrogen takes an inordinate amount of energy, bulk carriers have to deal with ports being reluctant to deal with such huge amounts of explosive material.
AlanE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-12, 08:38 AM   #8
Solar
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 77
Thanks: 2
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryland View Post
Half of the energy in a tank of hydrogen is used in compressing it, you would almost be better off compressing air (doesn't leak out of the tank as fast) and the equipment to use compressed air is much cheaper and lasts longer then fuel cells.
I would love to run my car off of compressed air, what kind of mpg would i get with a 2200lb car?
__________________
My Climate Change Blog
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Global Warming News - The Global Warming Times - Videos, Science, Solutions, Activism
Solar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-12, 09:15 AM   #9
Ryland
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Wisconsin.
Posts: 913
Thanks: 127
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Solar View Post
I would love to run my car off of compressed air, what kind of mpg would i get with a 2200lb car?
From what I've read it seems like it only takes twice as much electricity to power a compressed air car then it does to power a battery electric car, the energy to compress air to 12,000psi so that the tank will fit in the car takes a lot of energy, you of course also get unlimited A/C and in the winter time free cryogenic freezing because compressed air engines get cold as they take the energy out of the compressed air, 60 to 80 degree drop in temp at the tail pipe, leading to a nice brittle engine that requires special lubrication.
But just a rough guess, an electric car like the Nissan Leaf is about 320watt hours per mile, compressed air in that same car I would guess would be about 600 watt hours per mile and hydrogen would be 1kwh per mile.

Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design