EcoRenovator  

Go Back   EcoRenovator > Improvements > Wind Power
Advanced Search
 


Blog Register 60+ Home Energy Saving Tips Recent Posts Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-06-11, 09:27 PM   #1
dh1
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Ont. Canada
Posts: 99
Thanks: 14
Thanked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Default Wind power heat

I have an idea, maybe this has being discussed here before???
But what if you used the energy from a wind mill for a heat source instead of charging batteries or tying to the electrical grid.
Lets say you have a 1000watt wind mill that feeds electricity to a heating element in an insulated water tank that is used as a supplement for space heating.
I don't think that it would heat a house but it might cut down how much the furnace runs.
What do you guys think?

dh1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-11, 05:35 AM   #2
Piwoslaw
Super Moderator
 
Piwoslaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 922
Thanks: 175
Thanked 95 Times in 78 Posts
Default

That's exactly how excess power from wind turbines is used. When a wind gennie produces more power than the batteries/house can take at the moment, the extra electrons are routed through a dump load - usually a heating element. Often (but not always) this heating element is inside the hot water tank, reducing the need for other fuel types.
__________________
Ecorenovation - the bottomless piggy bank that tries to tame the energy hog.
Piwoslaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-11, 12:13 PM   #3
gspong
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

You could, but I'm not sure if you'd really want to(other than a dump load, as mentioned)
Seems like heat would be easier to produce with solar.

If you're grid-tied(and net-metered, depending on rates) you'd be better off sending it to the grid, heating as needed with grid power, and avoiding the storage losses.
If you're off-grid, maybe, I'm not sure how the storage losses compare.

Last edited by gspong; 05-07-11 at 12:19 PM..
gspong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-11, 06:44 PM   #4
Ryland
Master EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Western Wisconsin.
Posts: 913
Thanks: 127
Thanked 82 Times in 71 Posts
Default

You can get low voltage (12v, 24v or 48v) heating elements for water heating tanks to act as a dump load for off grid houses, sending electrons back on to the grid is a better use of the energy but for off grid houses you only have so much battery and need to either shut down the turbine or dump the extra energy so heating water does work well.
If you wanted to heat your house this way get a heat pump and use that as your dump load, phase change material is a great way to store energy, so running a freezer full of water would be cheap example of this as it takes 3 times the energy to get water that last degree to get it to freeze so it's a good energy storage medium, or on a larger scale get a farm milk bulk tank and fill it with water and connect it to your heat pump for heating or cooling, altho for either of these a dual heat pump would work best so in the winter you pump heat in to the tank from the outside then as you need it you pull heat off that tank of water and the extra heat radiates in to the house, in the winter you do the same thing.
Ryland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-11, 09:32 PM   #5
dh1
Helper EcoRenovator
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Ont. Canada
Posts: 99
Thanks: 14
Thanked 11 Times in 9 Posts
Default

I got this idea from the fact like you say that excess energy from windmills can be dumped in a water tank.
Didn't really want to have to buy any equipment to tie into the grid, just thought of using the energy from a windmill to supplement the heating system for a house.

Was thinking along the lines of
-Windmill,
-Insulated water tank,
-Circulating pump,
-Some method of transferring the heat to the house, like car radiator and fan
or perimeter pipe, or large coil of pipe, old cast iron heat exchanger, positioned low in the building.

Something simple and cheap that would work as a supplement.
dh1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-11, 10:24 AM   #6
itsandbits1
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ca.
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

the most efficient way to convert wind power to heat would be to have a windmill turn a magnet N S plate over an aluminum or copper plate immersed in water or have the water run through a coil on the al or cu plate with convection movement or a small pump to transfer the heated water. When the sun isnčt shining the wind is usually blowing, and it can do it 24 hrs a day
itsandbits1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-11, 01:14 AM   #7
kbhale
Helper EcoRenovator
 
kbhale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Evansville IN
Posts: 88
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

I like the idea of wind mill heat production. I been thinking about using divert load resistor for added heat in the bedroom during the winter. Plumbing for the bedroom would not be practical for me. An extension cord could be temporary and easy to run from the mill. So parts would be wind turbine, extension cord, bridge diodes to turn to dc and the divert load resistor.
Diversion Dump Load Resistors

Could put a three way switch at the wind mill to send the energy to the batteries when not needed for heat. The charge controller would divert it to a hot water element when batteries are full.

I think it would be great for those stormy winter nights. If i could get it to work
kbhale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-11, 01:36 AM   #8
itsandbits1
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ca.
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I don't know if you realize how little energy you can harvest with a small windmill but it's not much so every time you change it you lose some and soon you have not much. If you want ,I can point you to a site that will let you figure out how much energy is available at different wind speeds.
itsandbits1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-11, 12:57 AM   #9
kbhale
Helper EcoRenovator
 
kbhale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Evansville IN
Posts: 88
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

I live in a low wind area. Not much wind speed on sun shinny days. It seems to only blow well when the sunlight is poor.
kbhale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-11, 09:57 AM   #10
itsandbits1
Lurking Renovator
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ca.
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

this program suspects I am a spammer so it isn.t going to let me post links. I hate being criminallized before I do anything. I am not coming back here

itsandbits1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Ad Management by RedTyger
Inactive Reminders By Icora Web Design