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Old 05-13-11, 09:08 AM   #1
Daox
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Default Using basement sump water to cool the house

I've been talking with my uncle. He has a house and his sump pumps are running a LOT, year round. They run so much he burns through them in 1-2 years. He also runs redundant ones because of this to prevent flooding. Anyway, he has been thinking of what to do with the water. Initial thoughts were to use it for showering/flushing toilets/dishwasher. Later on, I thought maybe he could use that water (which is likely ~50-55F) to cool the house in the summer time. Just run the cool water through an a-coil in the ducting and voala, cooler air.

What do you guys think? I'm also looking for tips on what else could be done with the water.

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Old 05-13-11, 03:59 PM   #2
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I have similar sump pump water volumes; the potential for gray water flushing has crossed my mind a few times, but never as a "Mild HVAC cooling source" Hmmm...
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Old 05-13-11, 05:22 PM   #3
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It sounds like a great idea.

Sump pumps can draw an awful lot of power, and keeping them running is a hassle. The need for sump pumps is one reason I'm leaning towards building a house without a basement.
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Old 05-13-11, 05:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertSmalls View Post
It sounds like a great idea.

Sump pumps can draw an awful lot of power, and keeping them running is a hassle. The need for sump pumps is one reason I'm leaning towards building a house without a basement.
You, my friend are leaning in the right direction!!

A sure way to avoid thousands of dollars in damages & many hundreds
of hours of labor, doing clean-ups and reflooring etc. etc..

I would NEVER move into a another house with a basement.
If I was forced to, at gunpoint, It would have to be on top of a mountain,
and in the middle tornado alley.
http://www.causticsodapodcast.com/wp...07/tornado.jpg

~~~

If I had a good source of water in my basement (it was well-like),
I would size a GSHP to it.. If it was small, I would heat my hotwater.
If it was larger, I would use it for space heating & cooling..
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Old 05-13-11, 08:36 PM   #5
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Does anyone know how cold the refrigerant gets through a-coils? Does it get cold enough to produce condensation?
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Old 05-13-11, 08:56 PM   #6
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Hehehe.. I did not know what 'A' coils were. Then a little LED came on above my head..


I believe that's a drip pan on the bottom of the 'A'...

Dewpoint?


Right now, if I put 45 deg F water in a glass, I'll need a coaster under it..
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Old 05-13-11, 09:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daox View Post
Does anyone know how cold the refrigerant gets through a-coils? Does it get cold enough to produce condensation?
http://www.captiveaire.com/CATALOGCO...chrometric.gif
The dewpoint in my house right now is 68F! But that's because it's been 80-100% RH outside all day, and muggy for May. Also, ordinary people would have turned on the air conditioner, but instead I'm in conditioning for the hotter weather to come.

The point of this story is that you will get condensation at fairly unremarkable temperatures on a muggy enough day.
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Old 05-13-11, 09:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Does anyone know how cold the refrigerant gets through a-coils? Does it get cold enough to produce condensation?
It does get cold enough to produce condensation. for AC, it's usually just short of forming frost.

De-humidifiers do make frost, and they have a frost melting cycle designed in... that's how they extract water.

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Old 05-14-11, 02:40 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertSmalls View Post
It sounds like a great idea.

Sump pumps can draw an awful lot of power, and keeping them running is a hassle. The need for sump pumps is one reason I'm leaning towards building a house without a basement.
It depends on where you live. My house was built 2 1/2 decades ago and the sump is as dry as the day the house was built, no signs of moisture in there at all. I bought a house that slopes down on all four sides and made sure the street drainage ditch didn't have a grate near my house to indicate a low point. I'm actually at the center between two and roughly the highest point and no flood plains anywhere near me. Of course there may be places where luck would stike negatively but a benefit of buying a used house for me was to see there is no sump pump and a dry sump for the entire duration, an advantage that doesn't exist when buying new, but proper location and good grading of the property that slopes away from the house on all sides usually does the trick.
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Old 05-14-11, 08:51 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertSmalls View Post
The need for sump pumps is one reason I'm leaning towards building a house without a basement.
I certainly agree with MN Renovator.

In addition, is the issue of soil type.

I live in an area that is pretty flat for at least 1/2 mile in every direction.

My house is about 119 years old and has a basement with walls made from chunks of basalt rock mortared in with concrete. I doubt that any waterproofing was ever attempted.

The area I live in is infamous for its rainfall which averages 37.5 inches per year. So I'm in a borderline rainforest region.

In the event of a prolonged heavy rain, which would be maybe a week or two of continuous substantial rain, I do get some minor seepage into my basement, but in a day, it has all drained away.

The reason is the soil around me is largely sandy with some minor admixed clay.

And that makes all the difference.

So there are many factors that should be considered regarding the inclusion of a basement.

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