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Old 09-29-14, 11:17 PM   #11
David
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Thanks for the info Geoff.

I have a large Pavillion in my back yard. It is open on four sides. It is also cool as I set the concrete foundations 2 to 3 feet below ground. I plan to place a grid of pvc pipes under my dining table. Then with water from my bore circulating I will blow air (with some solar powered fans) through . This will be great in summer. In winter I will run hot water that I will soon be collecting from my garage roof. This will help me warm some of my cacti and succulent plantsd through winter.

Any suggestions?

Regards
David

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Old 10-01-14, 03:22 PM   #12
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Do something like Jerry did:

DIY Geothermal Heat Pump + PV System - No Heat Bills!

In your situation, no ground loop would be needed, since you already have a well. Also, you could run a water to air heat exchanger straight off the water source if the humidity is low enough, saving loads of electricity. If humidity became a problem, the water source heat pump could dry the already tempered air in no time flat.

Let me explain that one here. Lets say your home is 80 degF at 55% relative humidity and your ground source water is 59 degF. That's a 21 degF delta T. Run both through a water/air hx, and out comes cooler air at higher r.h. and warmer water. As the air is cooled, some of the heat transfer can be measured by the temperature drop (sensible heat), but usually a lot of the heat transferred is from the condensation of water vapor from the air stream (latent). The air exiting the hx will be some temp above the water entering the hx at high relative humidity. Sometimes it is near saturated.

As the indoor temperature drops, so does your delta T. When the two temps become close, less and less moisture is pulled from the air as it passes through the hx, while the exit air temp goes closer and closer to your entering water temp. The house ends up feeling clammy due to the high relative humidity, much like a root cellar or cave.

Since you already have a "conventional" air conditioner, it can be run periodically to dehumidify the cool wet air. Since the evaporator hx usually sources refrigerant temp not far above freezing, it can draw the extra humidity out of the air that is beyond the capability of the ground source water.

To save even more energy, you could run a "desiccant waterfall":

Last edited by jeff5may; 10-01-14 at 07:59 PM..
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Old 10-26-14, 05:46 AM   #13
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Hello jeff5may,

Thank you for your reply.

Unfortunately there is much that I do not understand.

I would appreciate it if you were to dumb it down a bit with suggestions as to parts required ie what I am trying to find out is what recyclable bits and pieces i can use.

I schematic diagram would be of considerable assisstance.

Once I have that I am (he says) clever enough to improvise and produce the desired result.

Kind regards ,
David
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Old 10-26-14, 06:02 PM   #14
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Parts needed:

1. Well with pump
2. Radiator of some kind
3. Plumbing
4. Blower
5. Thermostat

How to:

Connect the blower to the radiator to make air move through it at will. If ductwork is employed, seal all air leaks. Plumb the well to feed the radiator on command. Plumb the radiator to dump waste water from the well, and to drain condensation. Connect the thermostat to control the well pump and the blower so they operate only when cooling is called for. Commission and adjust the rig, sit back and enjoy the comfort.


The End (Experiment #1)

Good luck- take pics for us please!
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Old 10-31-14, 06:35 AM   #15
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Thanks mate (buddy) ,

Not rocket science is it?

I am just to lazy to get started.
But when I do i will let you know.

regards
David
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Old 10-31-14, 11:07 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff5may View Post
... you could run a water to air heat exchanger straight off the water source if the humidity is low enough, ...
Am I glad you added that bit of qualification !

Many rookies forget that a major benefit of A/C is dehumidification ! Coll humid air is uncomfortable. This is why "swamp coolers" only work well in very dry climates.
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Old 10-31-14, 09:11 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David View Post
Thanks mate (buddy) ,

Not rocket science is it?

I am just to lazy to get started.
But when I do i will let you know.

regards
David
I don't hate you. Take your time.
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Old 12-11-14, 11:50 PM   #18
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Thank you buddy(Mate)

There are so many things that need doing the faster I go the behinder i get.

Regards

aussie David

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