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Old 03-02-14, 09:09 AM   #1
doug30293
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Default PEX Plumbing

My experience with PEX in plumbing applications goes back to the time when it was known for leaking connections. Has this problem been completely solved?

I note that there are a variety of connection products, some of which seem to be quite expensive. Some just look like they won't provide a long term solution. Comments from experience are welcome.

I've had good luck with CPVC. How does PEX compare?

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Old 03-02-14, 11:58 AM   #2
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I think you are thinking of polybutylene plumbing (history of water leaks at connections). To my knowledge, PEX has not had any large scale history of leaks that I am aware of.

Polybutylene was the rage for a while (1980's - mid 1990s), but a large recall and large class action claim (~ 1998) made it a tough sell.

PEX is clearly the way to go today. One manifold and all home runs from appliances back to manifold home.

Yet some regions still do not allow it. Boston for example, mandates copper plumbing and black iron sewer pipe. No PEX or PVC anywhere. Strong plumbing union . . .

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Old 03-02-14, 01:26 PM   #3
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[IMG][/IMG]
Just last weekend I installed a PEX manifold and replaced most of the CPVC with PEX tubing. One thing that made it so easy is the ability to use the quick connects to connect the PEX to CPVC.


[IMG][/IMG]
I just ran the PEX up to where the CPVC enters the house.


Yesterday, Sunday March 1, I replaced the valve for my shower. I sure do love the quick connects. Made the job so easy.
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Old 03-03-14, 08:02 AM   #4
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I've also never had issues with PEX connections either. Its quick, easy, and cheap.

I like the 'cinch' crimp fittings. One tool can crimp all sizes. Works like a dream.

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Old 03-03-14, 01:37 PM   #5
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I like pvc much better than pex much cheaper. Plan on re plumbing the whole house with 1 1/4 pvc or 1 inch pvc. But the good thing on the pex. Its a bit easier to run in some cases. I dont worry about freezing because my lines are all burried under ground
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Old 03-03-14, 04:46 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehull View Post
I think you are thinking of polybutylene plumbing (history of water leaks at connections). To my knowledge, PEX has not had any large scale history of leaks that I am aware of.

Polybutylene was the rage for a while (1980's - mid 1990s), but a large recall and large class action claim (~ 1998) made it a tough sell.

PEX is clearly the way to go today. One manifold and all home runs from appliances back to manifold home.

Yet some regions still do not allow it. Boston for example, mandates copper plumbing and black iron sewer pipe. No PEX or PVC anywhere. Strong plumbing union . . .

Steve

That's not true. We have been using PEX and PVC in MA for years.
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Old 03-03-14, 06:07 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehull View Post
I think you are thinking of polybutylene plumbing (history of water leaks at connections). To my knowledge, PEX has not had any large scale history of leaks that I am aware of.

Polybutylene was the rage for a while (1980's - mid 1990s), but a large recall and large class action claim (~ 1998) made it a tough sell.

PEX is clearly the way to go today. One manifold and all home runs from appliances back to manifold home.

Yet some regions still do not allow it. Boston for example, mandates copper plumbing and black iron sewer pipe. No PEX or PVC anywhere. Strong plumbing union . . .

Steve
If some moron came down here and tried to tell me that i (Had) to use copper instead of what i wanted for my plumbing . He would leave with some copper or my size 13 steel toed boots kicked up his rump. Copper leaves a metalic taste to me. Pex is great stuff. I put some pex over at a buddies house . Easy to run. Been there for 5 years . Yet to have a leak.
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Old 03-04-14, 07:15 AM   #8
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Guys, I was talking Boston - not ALL of Massachusetts . . . . My point was that PEX is superior, but not all municipalities approve PEX.

Boston being an example.


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Old 03-04-14, 10:46 PM   #9
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Pex is the easiest plumbing for water I've used. No more water hammer. It can freeze numerous times without failure. Not too pricey as long as you stay with 3/4 inch or less. I use the crimp fittings and have yet to have any leaks.
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Old 03-05-14, 05:36 AM   #10
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Where does the water expand to if two points in the pipe freeze and the water has no where to go? Does PEX produce a bulge and contract back to normal again?

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