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Old 04-29-18, 10:35 PM   #1
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Default Modifying an industrial heater to have an exhaust function

Hi, I have a Reznor f400 industrial heater that is used to heat a large warehouse space. The unit is gas powered and heats air blown across a large burner by way of a fan that sits in the rear of the unit. The fan in my model runs on a Fasco D701 motor. Just in front of the fan and on the top of the unit is a vent shaft that leads to the roof.

The space can become quite warm in the summer months. There is considerable flow of air into the space through the use of air circulators but venting air has been a problem. I'm considering the possibility of installing an inline fan in the heater vent shaft in addition to reversing the Fasco fan native to the heater. Potentially these modifications could pull hot air from the space? Thoughts?

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Old 05-01-18, 05:12 PM   #2
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That "vent" on top is the natural draft exhaust for flue gasses. generally speaking, it's not wise to tamper with those, and assuming the heater is sized appropriately to the warehouse, likely not big enough to produce noticeable cooling if you did.

Product - Unit Heaters - F | Reznor

Are there any windows you could open up top? an actual exhaust fan up high could be productive (3000cfm+ each). It may actually be cooler with no additional work if you turn off your air circulators - assuming they're large ceiling fans blowing the hot air down.
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Old 05-02-18, 05:55 PM   #3
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That makes sense. I've also been considering installing a whole house fan in one of the windows, maybe even running duct work to it from the farther reaches of the space? Haven't seen any examples of that with a cursory search. The air circulators are standing floor fans. I'm fooling around now with fan placement and air flow. Had a funny thought of using bubbles to help observe the air currents.

anyways
thanks
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Old 05-08-18, 10:22 AM   #4
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Wouldn't you start with reducing heat gain by painting the roof white or roof insulation? I think that would give you the highest benefits.

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